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Posted on 17th Apr at 6:55 PM
Look at this asshole. #loner #asshole #loser #blackcat #feline #longinglylookingoutsidefordumbcatreasons
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Look at this asshole. #loner #asshole #loser #blackcat #feline #longinglylookingoutsidefordumbcatreasons

Posted on 15th Apr at 3:28 PM, with 93,836 notes

dick-rider-dave-strider:

dick-rider-dave-strider:

grandmoms are precious and must be protected at all costs

i told her i was posting this on tumblr and she said “let me know how many hits i get!!!” so just watch this and make an old woman happy

Amazing. What will they think of next?

Posted on 14th Apr at 11:56 PM, with 3 notes

Just farting around on my new iPhone.

Posted on 14th Apr at 11:13 PM, with 1,212 notes

officialunitedstates:

Let me take this opportunity to hijack your post and add some clearly obvious information that everyone knows.  But, I’m going to ignore the fact that everyone knows this incredibly commonplace information and instead tell you regardless so I can seem better than you.  And I’m going to do it condescendingly, too, because I think everyone else is an idiot because I know this one thing.  Let me tell you a thing.

Posted on 14th Apr at 7:31 PM, with 172 notes
mucholderthen:

The Volcano That Changed the Course of HistoryTAMBORA ERUPTION CAUSED NOT ONLY THE YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER, BUT LED TO CHOLERA, OPIUM, FAMINE, AND ARCTIC EXPLORATION

The floods, droughts, starvation, and disease in the three years following the 1815 eruption stem from the volcano’s effects on weather systems, so Tambora stands today as a harrowing case study of what the human costs and global reach might be from runaway climate change.

 Slate // APRIL 9 2014 (originally appeared in The Conversation)By Gillen D’Arcy Wood

Most have heard of the Battle of Waterloo, but who has heard of the volcano called Tambora? No school textbook I’ve seen mentions that only two months before Napoleon’s final defeat in 1815, the faraway Indonesian island of Sumbawa was the site of the most devastating volcanic eruption on Earth in thousands of years.
The death toll was around 100,000 people from the thick pyroclastic flows of lava; the tsunami that struck nearby coasts; and the thick ash that blanketed Southeast Asia’s farmlands, destroyed crops, and plunged it into darkness for a week.
Both events—Napoleon’s defeat and the eruption—had monumental impacts on human history. But while a library of scholarship has been devoted to Napoleon’s undoing at Waterloo, the scattered writings on Tambora would scarcely fill your in-tray.


It is time to recognize Tambora as the Napoleon of eruptions. The implications—for historians—of a revised, volcanic 19th century are immense. As with the global cholera epidemic, and the growth of a Chinese opium empire, Victorian-era polar exploration might not have happened at all, or would have evolved in an entirely different direction, had it not been for Tambora’s climate-wrecking detonation in 1815.
For two long centuries, the connections between this major volcanic disaster and human history have been obscured by two factors: the limitations of scientific knowledge, and by our narrow, anthropocentric vision that seeks out only human causes for human events, neglecting the influence of environmental change. Now, in the 21st century, as we begin to appreciate more profoundly the interdependence of human and natural systems, the lesson of a 200-year-old climate emergency may finally be learned: A changing climate changes everything.

Continue reading at Slate …
Gillen D’Arcy Wood is Director of Sustainability Studies Initiative in the Humanities and Professor of English at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign.  He is the author of Tambora: the Eruption that Changed the World, Princeton University Press (April 27, 2014; although Amazon claims April 13 shipping).
For more on Tambora, check out this post …
View high resolution

mucholderthen:

The Volcano That Changed the Course of History
TAMBORA ERUPTION CAUSED NOT ONLY THE YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER, BUT LED TO CHOLERA, OPIUM, FAMINE, AND ARCTIC EXPLORATION

The floods, droughts, starvation, and disease in the three years following the 1815 eruption stem from the volcano’s effects on weather systems, so Tambora stands today as a harrowing case study of what the human costs and global reach might be from runaway climate change.

Slate // APRIL 9 2014 (originally appeared in The Conversation)
By Gillen D’Arcy Wood

Most have heard of the Battle of Waterloo, but who has heard of the volcano called Tambora? No school textbook I’ve seen mentions that only two months before Napoleon’s final defeat in 1815, the faraway Indonesian island of Sumbawa was the site of the most devastating volcanic eruption on Earth in thousands of years.

The death toll was around 100,000 people from the thick pyroclastic flows of lava; the tsunami that struck nearby coasts; and the thick ash that blanketed Southeast Asia’s farmlands, destroyed crops, and plunged it into darkness for a week.

Both events—Napoleon’s defeat and the eruption—had monumental impacts on human history. But while a library of scholarship has been devoted to Napoleon’s undoing at Waterloo, the scattered writings on Tambora would scarcely fill your in-tray.

It is time to recognize Tambora as the Napoleon of eruptions. The implications—for historians—of a revised, volcanic 19th century are immense. As with the global cholera epidemic, and the growth of a Chinese opium empire, Victorian-era polar exploration might not have happened at all, or would have evolved in an entirely different direction, had it not been for Tambora’s climate-wrecking detonation in 1815.

For two long centuries, the connections between this major volcanic disaster and human history have been obscured by two factors: the limitations of scientific knowledge, and by our narrow, anthropocentric vision that seeks out only human causes for human events, neglecting the influence of environmental change. Now, in the 21st century, as we begin to appreciate more profoundly the interdependence of human and natural systems, the lesson of a 200-year-old climate emergency may finally be learned: A changing climate changes everything.

Continue reading at Slate

Gillen D’Arcy Wood is Director of Sustainability Studies Initiative in the Humanities and Professor of English at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign.  He is the author of Tambora: the Eruption that Changed the WorldPrinceton University Press (April 27, 2014; although Amazon claims April 13 shipping).

For more on Tambora, check out this post

Posted on 10th Apr at 11:26 PM, with 10 notes
gracevirginia:

how will we recall each otherwhen more memories have been collectedand other pictures are biggerand our hair has grown longer and beencut shortwill i be a warm place for your thoughts to rest ori mean or not
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gracevirginia:

how will we recall each other
when more memories have been collected
and other pictures are bigger
and our hair has grown longer and been
cut short
will i be a warm place for your thoughts to rest or
i mean or not

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